How To Get A Piece Of Wall Street's Cash

Amber Hestla's picture

Thursday, August 11, 2016 - 12:00am

by Amber Hestla

Today, I want to tell you about a way you can legally skim tens of thousands of dollars a year from some of the largest firms on Wall Street that has been called safe enough for widows and orphans.

It may sound fishy at first, but I promise it is 100% legal. And it is widely regarded (at least by those in the know) as one of the most conservative strategies in the market.

I have taught hundreds of people -- from young couples struggling to make ends meet to retirees -- how to supplement their income with it.

Last year alone, I skimmed $46,360 from some of the largest firms on Wall Street.


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It was easy to do. The money was just sitting there. And if I hadn't taken it, someone else would have. I just beat them to it.

Where Is This Money Coming From?
To show you how it works, you must first understand some basics, like the many ways to place a stock order.

I'm sure you're familiar with the most common ways, such as market orders that get filled at the market price or limit orders where you specify how much you're willing to pay for the shares.

But there are many other ways to buy stocks besides these simple types of orders. The one I'm about to show you allows Wall Street to take money from people placing those orders without ever selling them a single share. This is how Wall Street skims money.

Let's say a trader wants to buy 100 shares of Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) six weeks from now at $115 a share. To do so, he simply needs to give his broker a $790 deposit. If in six weeks shares are trading for $115 or more, the order gets filled. If shares don't reach $115, his order won't get filled -- and he won't get his deposit back.

Now, I don't believe in taking money from people without their consent. And I certainly don't believe in hurting someone else financially while I'm getting rich.

But ordinary investors wouldn't buy stock this way. For us, it doesn't make any sense. But professional traders and speculators use orders like this as part of elaborate trading strategies. The risk of losing the deposit is calculated into the cost of the trade, just like paying a stock commission is for you and me.

And Wall Street was going to take this money anyway. There are 30 million orders like this placed every day, and three-quarters of them expire without ever getting filled, meaning Wall Street keeps three-quarters of the deposits.

The fact that most of the orders don't get filled is not surprising when you look at some of them. For instance, I recently saw an order to buy Netflix in three weeks for $180 a share.

Now keep in mind, Netflix is trading for less than $100 a share. For the order to be filled, Netflix would have to roughly double in three weeks.

As you will probably agree, that's very unlikely. Netflix's share price has never gone up that high or that fast. And the chances of it happening in three weeks are close to nil.

Of course, Wall Street is happy to keep this money. But there is a way we can intercept these deposits and keep them for ourselves.

How To Beat Wall Street To The Punch
The first thing you'll have to do is get your brokerage account cleared to use these orders.

Some accounts are already unlocked by default, but if not, it's easy to set up. You can usually arrange it with a quick phone call to your broker.

The size of the deposits you can grab changes from day to day. For instance, I recently saw 37,470 orders on Netflix that expired worthless. Many of the deposits were small -- just one or two dollars -- and not worth going after. But others were much larger. I saw 1,561 orders with $757 deposits each expire without getting filled. I also saw:

-- 194 deposits of $840
-- 553 deposits of $660
-- 2,457 deposits of $560
-- 3,388 deposits of $226
-- 251 deposits of $715
-- 825 deposits of $645
-- 3,120 deposits of $300
-- 119 deposits of $855
-- 220 deposits of $750
-- 264 deposits of $465

It's like this every single week. And this is all money you could easily intercept from Wall Street.

I realize this may still sound a bit shady or complicated. But I assure you it's not. And I have average investors just like you who will testify to this.

I have been helping them collect hundreds, even thousands, of dollars each month, and I can show you how to do the same. If you're interested in learning more, follow this link.

Amber Hestla does not personally hold positions in any securities mentioned in this article.
StreetAuthority LLC does not hold positions in any securities mentioned in this article.